Wonderful wonder foods!

Wonderful wonder foods

Our friends over at Stop the Pop have jumped on board our cause and done us a massive favour by utilising their expert nutritional knowledge and researching which foods can provide our skin with vital added sun protection! To check out the list of foods that we should all be eating this summer, read their post at: http://stopthepopcampaign.wordpress.com/2013/10/11/food-skin-protection-burn-soothing-follower-request/

So, after our recent (yummy) discovery about dark chocolate we decided to look into this a little more!! We found out that tomatoes – one of our favourite salad additives – contain an antioxidant called lycopene which works as a natural guard to UV for our skin, but is something that our bodies only really get through consuming tomatoes. The BBC conducted an experiment to attempt to decipher how effective the consumption of tomatoes were in practically protecting our skin. Their findings proved that indeed, those who consume a certain amount of lycopene from tomatoes did have an increased tolerance to UV rays! To read more on this go to: http://www.bbc.co.uk/…/truthaboutfood/young/tomatoes.shtml

After all this food talk, we know what will be on our shopping lists this summer!

DARK CHOCOLATE, A WELCOME SAVIOUR

DARK CHOCOLATE, A WELCOME SAVIOUR

SKIN HEALTH: One of our fans – Hannah McDonald – happened across this great excerpt from the August edition of Cosmopolitan magazine: Sugar is a well-known detriment to the health of our skin except, interestingly, in the case of dark chocolate! Wrongly thought to aggravate acne, dark chocolate with at least 60% cacao helps skin stay hydrated and protects it from sun damage. Get munching babes!
— PS: stay tuned for more food related posts regarding skin protection!

UV RAYS

UV RAYS

“Spring is here! Don’t forget, even if its not hot, if the UV level is 3 or above, you need to slip, slop, slap, seek and slide!”

An awesome tip from Cancer Council Australia – Many people take note of the time of day where the UV is highest in order to maximise the colour they gain to their skin when lying outside. Instead, plan activities where you can enjoy the weather without exposing yourself to the harm of the sun. Anything from lunching at an outdoor restaurant, to climbing the Harbour Bridge! Resist those wrinkles youngsters, there’s way cooler things to do than tan that wont leave you rottenly raisin-ed by 30!

A perfect tip on this sweltering day!

GOOD MORNING

GOOD MORNING

With lots going on in the sporting world and on Sydney’s social scene, I’m wondering, has anyone woken up on this lovely Monday looking like this as the result of a botch spray tan job from the weekend past?? I’m feeling healthy, fresh, and ready to take on the week after making sure I lathered up on the suncream while enjoying the warm weather out on the beach these last few days 🙂

A REAL ROASTING

Roastings

“While tanning oils themselves aren’t harmful to the human body, it’s what they are used for that can cause some serious problems.” – http://www.livestrong.com/article/252239-what-are-the-dangers-of-tanning-oil/#ixzz2fycKu4sl

On this 32 degree day I’m sitting in the shade on the steps along the beach at Manly, watching scores of people rubbing tanning oil onto their skin to ‘help’ them tan. Isn’t it scary that it’s exactly the same thing your mum does to the roast chicken or turkey to achieve that tough, brown skin? And indeed, tough brown skin is what you’ll get after prolonged use of tanning aids such as oils and sun beds. Aside from the serious health risks such as cancer, which I have already extensively outlined, there are some real aesthetic downsides to it too. While a tan might make you look good temporarily, the look of them barely lasts beyond Autumn, but I can guarantee the effects do:

“In addition to the risk of skin cancer, tanning excessively contributes to ageing quickly. Tans may cover cellulite and give the appearance of clear skin; however, the skin actually looks worse once the tan fades. Premature wrinkling is an enormous side of effect of tanning.” – http://www.ehow.com/about_5465473_tanning-oil-dangers.html#ixzz2fydiwA3m

With all the horrendous side effects associated with trying to achieve a natural tan, it’s any wonder why people are still resorting to such lengths. And according to recent reports, the health effects of fake tans look to be just as serious. By definition, fake tan is “[a] lotions, sprays, creams, mousses and combined moisturiser and fake tan products contain dihydroxyacetone (DHA), a chemical or vegetable dye that temporarily stains the skin, giving a tanned appearance. The dye interacts and binds with the dead skin cells located in the upper layer of the skin. The colour comes off when the dead skin cells flake off – approximately 1 week after application.” http://www.cancer.org.au/content/pdf/CancerControlPolicy/PositionStatements/PS-Fake_tans_August_2007.pdf
They contain a range of different chemicals like carcinogens, nano particles and DHA, some of which have been linked with contributing to serious health issues including hormone disruptions leading to birth defects, infertility and breast cancer, genetic mutation, DNA damage, and irritation of the skin and lungs. While some of these chemicals like nano particles do have some other useful functions, scientists’ lack of knowledge on the behaviour of these particles on a small scale means we should be very cautious as consumers.

Secondly, as Australia’s Cancer Council points out in its ‘Position Statement‘ for fake tan, there seems to be a misconception that fake tan acts to provide UV protection for our skin for the duration of the ‘tan’:

“Some people who use fake tans mistakenly believe that a tan will provide them with protection against UV radiation. As a result, they may not take sun protection measures, putting them at greater risk of skin cancer.” – http://www.cancer.org.au/preventing-cancer/sun-protection/causes-of-skin-cancer.html

While it is undeniably more beneficial (health wise) for the tan-obsessed to use any number of alternative skin products that achieve a bronzed look in a much safer way, the sheer volume of these products available indicates the real underlying societal issue – that people need to be tanned, no matter what. Indeed, the Cancer Council’s number one recommendation in relation to fake tan is:

  1. “Cancer Council does not promote the perception that tanned skin is more desirable than pale skin”

Whether its real tan or fake tan, you’ll likely end up either with health problems and wrinkles or streaky orange legs that smell a little like urine. There are plenty of skin products available in supermarkets and at beauty stores that are designed to moisturise and enrich our natural skin, giving it a healthy glow no matter what colour. A few of my favourites include:

  • Palmers Olive Butter lotion: http://www.palmersaustralia.com/products/body-care/olive-butter-formula-lotion-250ml/
  • L’Occitane Verbena Harvest body lotion: http://shop.davidjones.com.au/djs/en/davidjones/beauty/bath–body—hair/verbena-harvest-body-lotion-250ml
  • Kiehl’s Creme De Corps: http://www.kiehls.com.au/travel/travel-ready-formulas/creme-de-corps?gclid=CLCR-I7B6LkCFcpfpQod5WMAPw

[Photo courtesy of steamykitchen.com]

CAN THE TAN CAN

CAN THE TAN CAN

CAN THE TAN CAN: Bad spray tans – It is hard understand why young people think that a streaky orange fake tan looks better than the skin they were born in. Sun protection is important, but so is changing people’s attitudes about needing to look bronzed. The two go hand in hand. Tell me guys, which look would you prefer?
[Photo courtesy of glowandgoimaging.com]